Three Must Know Tips for Maximizing TweetDeck to Manage Your Twitter

I’m sure you’ve heard of Twitter, but have you heard of TweetDeck? If you’re in the marketing  and communications space, you probably have a Twitter account, if not many Twitter accounts. Managing multiple accounts can get overwhelming, as you are constantly having to log-in to each different account and remember multiple logins and passwords for each. There are a few services out there that make this process much easier, with the two most popular being TweetDeck and HootSuite. Both have their pros and cons but I tend to stick with TweetDeck. It has all the functionality I need and I’ve just become accustomed to using it.

TweetDeck is a free desktop application that you can download from the TweetDeck website. Once installed, you can then link in all of the Twitters accounts you are managing along with other accounts such as your LinkedIn or Facebook accounts. From there, you can pretty much handle all of the functionality of being logged in to all of those services, right from your TweetDeck desktop interface. And that is where the fun starts!

Here are three useful functionalities of TweetDeck that can make your Twitter account management that much easier:

Tip #1: Monitor your business space, not just your brand.

You may have set up a search for your brand name or Twitter handle, but have you set up a custom search for your keywords? TweetDeck allows you to continually monitor the conversation on Twitter by establishing a custom search column for any words you desire. You may already be using Google Alerts for this type of service but you may also want to consider a service like TweetDeck. For example, say I sell insurance and want to be alerted when someone says the following on Twitter: “need car insurance.”

I can set up a custom alert for this keyword set and TweetDeck will let me know whenever this statement is tweeted. I’m then able to quickly respond to that person on Twitter to ask if my firm can be of service.

Set up your search by first clicking the add column plus sign. Then ensure search is selected as seen in the image and enter the search term in the field.

Communications marketing with TweetDeck search

Tip #2: Customize the TweetDeck pop-up alerts to notify you.

TweetDeck has a desktop pop-up window much like email and chat services do. If you are using Outlook, then you’ve likely seen one of these pop-up windows appear in the lower right corner of your monitor when you receive a new email. The TweetDeck default setting will alert you with a pop-up and sound whenever any of your columns are updated. TweetDeck allows you to customize this pop-up to alert you only in certain instances. In order to keep the pop-ups to a minimum, I set my TweetDeck to notify me only when I may want to respond. For instance, I have alerts set-up to notify me when anyone mentions my company name or my keywords that I want to respond to.

Set up your alerts by clicking on the settings button (the little wrench).  Then select Notifications in the left side bar and click the Advanced Options for columns button. This will allow you to customize all of your pop-up notifications to alert you only when you think it is necessary.

Marketing and Communications with Tweetdeck Alerts

Tip #3: Use the timer to schedule your tweets during optimal times.

One of the coolest options of TweetDeck is the ability to schedule your tweets. Let’s say you want to tweet something at a specific time. Just click on the little clock symbol next to the send button and schedule when you want your updates to go out. You can also select multiple networks on which to send out the update.

Schedule marketing communications with TweetDeck

For instance, say I get inspired one night and stay up late writing a blog post. When I finish the post, I don’t want to tweet it right away because most of my readers are asleep. I know that most of my potential readers usually visit blogs from work at around 8am to 9am every weekday, which is also the time I notice they share the most on Twitter and Facebook. So I can set up my TweetDeck to tweet my new blog post at 7:55am and hit the optimal time to gain the most readers’ attention. This allows me to sleep in a little bit after staying up so late writing.

The Future of TweetDeck

Recently, a few stories have been running that TweetDeck was being purchased by Twitter for a sum around $45 million. So I guess this answers the question of how TweetDeck makes money! In reality, TweetDeck didn’t seem to have a source of revenue for the creators, but maybe that was the most important part. By not charging, being simple to use, and remaining advertisement free, TweetDeck was adopted quickly by a large user base, making it one of the most popular platforms for interfacing with Twitter accounts (along with other social media accounts).  I’ve always enjoyed using TweetDeck to manage my online accounts and am excited to hear of the proposed purchase by Twitter. Hopefully this will ensure that TweetDeck continues to work extremely well with Twitter in the coming years.

Got any TweetDeck tips you’d like to share? Let us know in the comments…

About Scott McIntosh

Scott McIntosh is one of Nashville's top authorities on web marketing and strategy. He enjoys discussing (and learning about) every aspect of the web including search optimized website design, public relations / publicity, video creation and distribution, social media, and customer conversion through optimized user experience.
This entry was posted in Brand Management, Networking, Twitter. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Three Must Know Tips for Maximizing TweetDeck to Manage Your Twitter

  1. Pingback: How to Monitor Social Media for Your Business | Lovell Communications

  2. Bob says:

    Do you have an update on this for Tweetdeck 2.1.0? Thank you!

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