Lovell Communications Survey: Will the Economy Improve, Get Worse or Remain the Same During the Next Six Months?

*Update 5/13: Nashville Business Journal covered the survey results here: Area Business Leaders Bullish on Economy.*

Just last week, almost 90 percent (89.1%) of 174 survey respondents indicated they believe that the economy will either remain the same or improve over the next six months.  Better yet, about 55 percent (54.5%) think the economy will improve, and slightly more than 10 percent (10.9%) think it will get worse.

lovell-communications-economic-survey

[graph displays rounded figures]

Even before the recent good news about corporate earnings and better-than-feared bank stress test results, I was getting the feeling that we have begun to turn the corner.  So, I wanted to ask a broad base of business associates (who are likely based more predominantly in southeast) if they thought things were improving or not.

I asked them to ignore what they read or see in the media and to respond based on their own personal experience and gut reactions.  Specifically 19 people said they expect the economy to be worse in six months, 60 said it would be about the same and 95 felt it would improve.

I am liking these numbers! What do you think?

This entry was posted in Economy, Lovell, Survey and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Lovell Communications Survey: Will the Economy Improve, Get Worse or Remain the Same During the Next Six Months?

  1. Tracy Young says:

    Interesting survey. I’m among the 55% who think the economy is turning around. Glad to see others think so, too.

  2. Nick Tazik says:

    Me too, Tracy. I find results like these especially encouraging because the perceptions of consumers and business professionals are so influential on the broader performance of our economy. Things are looking up.

  3. Nick is correct–the perception of whether the economy is beginning to improve is directly related to how people react in their own lives (and in their businesses.) That “sentiment” is a powerful influencer toward the reality of growth.

  4. Ron Keener says:

    When you talk about the present economy I think you have to divide it into two or three different things. Is housing improving and are sales rising–yes, probably there are indicators of progress out there.

    Are people getting their jobs back after layoffs? No, not likely. A lot of people won’t find those jobs they left there anymore and the market place is changing. So many people will need to find other work–and that isn’t going to change dramatically for a long time. Community colleges will be busy with retraining.

    Are people saving money now? Yes, it appears they are, but that means money is not going back into the economy, even as this country needs to see its savings rate improve.

    There is a lot to be said for the “reset” of our economy, meaning that it won’t return to what it has been any time soon, and Americans may need to make severe adjustments to their economic life, their standard of living, their purchasing decisions. It ain’t going to be what it has been.

    We better begin to look differently at life and work and jobs and the American Way. It is still a long climb upward!

  5. john bentley says:

    dear paula, i have read your blog and i can only say not only are home sales down but the government is not doing a damn thing to help things. the huge debts that it is incurring will be the end of america as we know it. you are a smart girl and with you fed backgroung you should know that we are going down a road to economic oblivion.
    if you don’t hate me too much get back to me and tell me how your life has been and i will respond. if not then know that at least you have someone who thinks and cares about you . jb

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>